Kurdish Iraqi Students

New Peace and Human Rights Study Program in Iraq Kurdistan Gives Young People Hope for Change

At the university of Duhok in the Kurdish region of Northern Iraq, a new promising study program has been set up focused on peace and human rights. Next year, the first cohort of graduates in Peace and Human Rights Studies will go out into society to show what peace studies can do for the wider community. At the moment there are 242 students in the department following courses about multiculturalism, conflict resolution and human rights. Many young people have chosen the study program hoping to initiate change by creating a more inclusive society. The program is very popular, attracting almost three times the anticipated number of students in the first year. This initiative might contribute to more positive stances towards minorities and people from different ethnicities in Kurdistan, as well as the wider region. In doing so, it could help to create a new generation of people that are aware of human rights and the conditions that can lead to peace building and stability. Complete Article HERE

Israeli teens rally for LGBT

Thousands of Teens Protest Education Minister’s Remarks About LGBT Couples

Thousands of high school students held a demonstration Wednesday protesting remarks last week by Education Minister Rafi Peretz in which he appeared to call same-sex marriage unnatural. The students and teachers rallied in Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square under the slogan “Demanding Change.” The demonstration was organized by student councils from several high schools, with buses bringing protesters to the event, Hebrew media reported. “We are not against Rafi Peretz, we are not against the ideas of anyone,” Hila Koren, 16, told told Channel 13 News, but rather against the way political leaders have expressed themselves. “When the education minister defines ‘normal’ as being heterosexual, it contradicts students’ education about tolerance and being considerate of others,” Koren explained… Complete Article HERE

City Montessori School (Lucknow) founder-manager Jagdish Gandhi with students

His Dream: World Peace Through Education

The numbers speak for themselves: 56,000 students, 18 campuses and a Guinness World Record. Year after year, students dominate academic lists, crack competitive examinations, take part in many international events, rub shoulders with foreign students and delegates on a daily basis and the list of co-curricular engagements continues. At 84, City Montessori School (Lucknow) founder-manager Jagdish Gandhi leads the largest chain of private English-speaking schools in the state capital. “My vision was to prepare not just literate adults but world citizens, who, apart from being adept at material knowledge, were endowed with the virtues of humankind (peace, unity and brotherhood) and who would act as agents of social transformation,” said Gandhi. The school that he established as City Montessori School in Lucknow with just five students, today, has over 56,000 students enrolled on 18 campuses and has found place in the Guinness World Records as the World’s Largest School by Pupils in a single city.  Complete Article HERE

Kurdish Children Study Underground in Turkey

In Turkey, Kurdish Educators Take Their Classrooms Underground Amid Repression

“When you open the Turkish school books, you learn about one nation, one language, and one history,” said Rana, a Kurdish educator in Diyarbakir who in fear of reprisal asked to use a pseudonym to protect her identity. “I don’t want future generations to experience this. I want the children to learn about themselves, their cultures and about various societies around the world,” she added. Rana is one of a few educators who are teaching Kurdish children in an underground, informal school system which shifts between the homes of students in Diyarbakir – keeping away from the eyes of Turkish authorities. “If the Turkish government discovers us, they can do whatever they want,” Rana said. “They could label us as terrorists and throw us in jail for years if they want to.” Complete Article HERE

ICRC-Humanitarian actors needed for education

Why Education Needs the Support of Humanitarian Actors in Conflict Zones

The past three years have been an exciting and thought-provoking journey for the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement on the question of education. Strong momentum and commitment have been built, without shying away from critical and legitimate questions and dilemmas around how neutral, impartial and independent actors can support education meaningfully and without jeopardizing humanitarian principles. The lack of a functioning education system should not paralyze humanitarian actors. On the contrary, it should spur them into action because they are uniquely placed to respond to the urgency of ensuring the continuity of education. For girls, in particular, seizing the window of opportunity for education is crucial, because they face more and more pressures and barriers as they reach adolescence. Complete Article HERE

Tunisian Students in Classroom

Tunisia Becomes First Arab Country to Introduce Sex Education in Schools

Tunisia will become the first country in the Arab world to introduce sex education at schools, according to Arzak Khaneetch, executive director of the Tunisian Association of Reproductive Health. Her organization partnered up with the United Nations Population Fund and the Arab Institute for Human Rights to start this initiative under the umbrella of Tunisia’s education ministry. Sex education will be embedded in different parts of the curriculum as opposed to having one subject that is fully dedicated to the discipline. “We will carry out the plan based on the ages of the children … throughout the whole time, we emphasize consent and safety,” says Khaneetch.  The curriculum will be appropriate to age, culturally and religiously sensitive and simplified for younger children, focusing on messages of awareness to protect them from harassment.  Complete Article HERE

Former PM Tony Blair at recent Lisbon Summit

Tony Blair Calls for Global Education Charter to Fight Extremism

Tony Blair has called for a dramatic increase in resources for education that combats extremism in a report that says learning is an underappreciated tool to deploy against violent ideologies. The report titled “Teaching Tolerance: How to Educate Against Extremism,” issued by the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change said it hoped to a launch a charter for education reform that nations could sign up to as part of the UN Global Goals. The principles in the charter would seek to address the threat from radicalization in the early years of life, an aspect that security polices had not so far confronted on a world widewide scale. By redressing the imbalance between military and financial responses to extremism, the initiative hopes for an antidote to the spread of hate… Complete Article HERE

Director of Community Violence Reduction, Shonna Majors giving speech with chief of police and mayor of Bellamy Park, IN

Early Childhood Education Can Prevent Violence Later in Life

If we are committed to preparing our children to be productive members of society, we must include character building in the curriculum. Our youth are our future—and the more we can invest in their education and character building at an early age, the more likely they are to succeed. Early childhood education is critical for the formation of good school habits, learning habits, and the ability to thrive in a school environment. Parents and teachers play an important role in establishing how best to help each child learn, as well as providing them with creative tools to help them cope with trauma and the ups and downs of life.  Complete Article  HERE

Committee of UN Envoys, and leaders representing children and refugees and ECW Director dealing with: Humanitarian Crises That Leave Millions of Children Without Schools or Education.

World’s Spreading Humanitarian Crises Leave Millions of Children Without Schools or Education

There are over 260 million children who don’t go to schools, mostly because there are none, while the education of an estimated 75 million children and youth have been disrupted by humanitarian crises. One of the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG4) is aimed at ensuring that everyone—-”no matter who they are, or where they live”—can access quality education by the targeted date of 2030. Achieving that formidable goal has been undertaken by Education Cannot Wait (ECW) described as the first global, multi-lateral fund dedicated to education in emergencies. Launched in 2016, and hosted by the UN children’s agency UNICEF, ECW has provided educational opportunities, in its first two years of operation, to over 1.5 million children and youth caught up in the widespread humanitarian crises…  Complete Article  HERE

A 12-year-old Jewish student of Cheltenham Secondary College forced to kiss the feet of a Muslim child in an antisemitic incident.

‘A Rapidly Spreading Crisis’—Anti-Semitism in Melbourne’s Public Schools

A five-year-old student at Hawthorn West Primary School began wetting himself in class after he was subjected to anti-Semitic bullying over the course of four months, while a 12-year-old student at Cheltenham Secondary College was forced to kiss the feet of a Muslim child and was physically assaulted. The first child was being bullied on a daily basis by five classmates in the school bathrooms. It started when he was questioned about being circumcised. Then came the barrage of anti-Semitic insults, including “Jewish vermin,” “the dirty Jew” and a “Jewish cockroach.” At home, the five-year-old broke down. “He literally fell down on the floor,” his mother shared with The AJN,”and said, ‘Mummy, you shouldn’t love me. I’m a worthless, Jewish rodent. I’m vermin.'” But when raised with the school, the mother says they were “dismissive” of the anti-Semitic element. The school’s solution was to keep the student from using the regular bathroom, offering the facilities of another bathroom instead. According to the student’s mother, “they refused to accept there was an anti-Semitic issue. ‘It’s not anti-Semitism, it’s just bullying.’ The principal said: “I don’t want to make other students feel uncomfortable.” Complete Article  HERE